Technology News

Samsung Electronics downbeat on third quarter prospects as profits slide

Customers attend a workshop about the Samsung Galaxy S5 in JakartaBy Se Young Lee SEOUL (Reuters) - Samsung Electronics Co Ltd. on Thursday reported its worst quarterly profit in two years and flagged uncertain earnings prospects for its key handset business, fuelling worries about its ability to return to growth. The downbeat guidance, as well as Samsung's decision to keep its interim dividend unchanged from last year, put the shares of South Korea's biggest company by market value on track for their worst daily percentage decline in nearly eight months. Samsung expects July-September handset shipments to pick up by 10 percent from the previous quarter and said it planned to release a new premium smartphone employing a new design and material, underscoring efforts by the world's largest smartphone maker to regroup. With its flagship Galaxy S5 smartphone outsold by Apple Inc's iPhone 5S in May and its cheaper devices feeling the squeeze from Chinese rivals like Xiaomi, Samsung also vowed to revamp its mid-to-low-tier product lineup with more aggressive pricing and a focus on a smaller set of products.


Microsoft ordered by U.S. judge to submit customer's emails from abroad

A shadow of a man using his mobile phone is cast near Microsoft logo at the 2014 Computex exhibition in TaipeiBy Joseph Ax NEW YORK (Reuters) - Microsoft Corp must turn over a customer's emails and other account information stored in a data center in Ireland to the U.S. government, a judge ruled on Thursday, in a case that has drawn concern from privacy groups and major technology companies. Microsoft and other U.S. companies had challenged the warrant, arguing it improperly extended the authority of federal prosecutors to seize customer information held in foreign countries. Following a two-hour court hearing in New York, U.S. District Judge Loretta Preska said a search warrant approved by a federal magistrate judge required the company to hand over any data it controlled, regardless of where it was stored.


Smartphone management flaws puts users at risk, researchers say

Fans take pictures with their phones at the beginning of the international friendly soccer match between Romania and Argentina at the National Arena in BucharestBy Eric Auchard VIENNA (Reuters) - Security researchers have revealed two separate threats this week they say could put up to 90 percent of the world's 2 billion plus smartphones at risk of password theft, stolen data and in some cases let hackers take full control of devices. One vulnerability involves flaws in the way scores of manufacturers of Apple, Google Android and Blackberry devices, among others, have implemented an obscure industry standard that controls how everything from network connections to user identities are managed. The threat could enable attackers to remotely wipe devices, install malicious software, access data and run applications on smartphones, Mathew Solnik, a mobile researcher with Denver-based cyber security firm Accuvant, said in a phone interview. A separate threat specifically affecting up to three-quarters of devices running older Android software has been unearthed by researchers at Bluebox Security of San Francisco.


China slams Canada for 'irresponsible' hacking accusations
China's foreign ministry accused Canada on Thursday of making irresponsible accusations lacking any credible evidence after Canada singled out Chinese hackers for attacking a key computer network and lodged a protest with Beijing. Officials said "a highly sophisticated Chinese state-sponsored actor" had recently broken into the National Research Council. The council, Canada's leading research body, works with major companies such as aircraft and train maker Bombardier Inc.. Canada has reported hacking incidents before, but this was the first time it had singled out China. China is often cited as a suspect in various hacking attacks on companies in the United States and other countries.

Hackers can tap USB devices in new attacks, researcher warns

German crypto specialist Nohl of Berlin's SR Labs is reflected in computer screen in BerlinBy Jim Finkle BOSTON (Reuters) - USB devices such as keyboards, thumb-drives and mice can be used to hack into personal computers in a potential new class of attacks that evade all known security protections, a top computer researcher revealed on Thursday. Karsten Nohl, chief scientist with Berlin's SR Labs, noted that hackers could load malicious software onto tiny, low-cost computer chips that control functions of USB devices but which have no built-in shields against tampering with their code. It is almost like a magic trick," said Nohl, whose research firm is known for uncovering major flaws in mobile phone technology. Nohl said his firm has performed attacks by writing malicious code onto USB control chips used in thumb drives and smartphones.


Mobile Courtship: French Suitor Makes T-Mobile Offer
Upstart French telecom company Iliad SA on Thursday said it has offered $15 billion for a majority stake in T-Mobile US.






Nintendo's Game Boy Celebrates 25th Birthday
The handheld gaming console that started it all, Game Boy, turned 25 years old Thursday, as difficult as that may be to believe.






Is This the Death of Passwords?
If you hate trying to fill out those CAPTCHA forms with impossible-to-decipher characters, a new security strategy might give you some hope.






How Virtual Therapy Could Help the Military Fight PTSD
Meet Ellie, the virtual therapist that could one day help diagnose everyone from soldiers to cancer patients.






How Virtual Therapy Could Help the Military Fight PTSD
Meet Ellie, the virtual therapist that could one day help diagnose everyone from soldiers to cancer patients.






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